WaPo finally catches up to McClatchy which had this headline last month

34,000 troops will be sent to Afghanistan

This is significant because the last time McClachy headlined that article the same way, Obama immediately got its official propaganda paper to soften it to

Obama May Add 30,000 Troops in Afghanistan

and within the article they fudged it lower

he would send as many as 25,000 to 30,000

with room to wiggle

the final number remained in flux.

And they fluxed and they fluxed and got back to 34,000.

And what’s funny about this number is that it was already published back in October by WaPo, as “unannounced authorization of troop increase”

President Obama announced in March that he would be sending 21,000 additional troops to Afghanistan. But in an unannounced move, the White House has also authorized — and the Pentagon is deploying — at least 13,000 troops beyond that number, according to defense officials.

The deployment of the support troops to Afghanistan brings the total increase approved by Obama to 34,000

So, why the unannouncing/changing the numbers?

The propaganda cycle is chronicled  here

But a detailed examination of news coverage of the reassessment issue in the major national newspapers, primarily The Washington Post and The New York Times, suggests that many angles and details of the stories were being carefully fed by White House aides to all-too-willing reporters who dressed it up as the inside dope. In reality, many reporters were steered into spinning the story exactly the way the White House wanted it told, with relatively little skepticism or criticism.

Maybe  it has to do with that eyesight  problem former war activists seem to suffer lately as per Mr Fish’s cartoon...

Or maybe it comes from all the xeroxing they’ve been doing, including stealing the Bush/Cheney war plans

“bears a striking resemblance” to the one announced by President Obama in March.

Bush administration handed Obama’s transition team a policy review of the Afghan war conducted last fall to meet the new challenges posed by the Taliban.“They asked us not to announce our findings publicly, and we agreed, giving them the benefit of our work and the benefit of the doubt,” Cheney said.